Harbingers of Change in Healthcare: Implications for the Role and Use of Medicines

 This report is focused on ten “harbingers of change”—recent events that may be a threshold reached, a decision made or an action taken. We believe these events represent turning points that will have a significant long-term impact on the role or use of medicines in the future and will affect all healthcare stakeholders.

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Summary

As the global market for drugs surpasses $1 trillion this year, growing payer scrutiny of value for money is just one of the factors that will drive disruptive change in the use of medicines over the next decade. The ten harbingers of change identified by the IMS Institute reflect the deep and rapid changes in the global health sector that are upending business models and forcing all stakeholders to re-evaluate their approaches to bringing healthcare to patients. They point to a future of evidence-based and integrated decision-making powered by information and technology, improved patient outcomes with millions of lives saved through transformational disease treatments, and expanded use of medicines in more efficient, connected health systems. The dynamics will affect existing business models and healthcare systems, bringing opportunities to those leaders who understand, embrace and adapt to the new landscape.

Featured Videos

Below, IMS Institute Executive Director Murray Aitken discusses three key findings in this report. Click here to view additional videos from this report.

Key Findings 

Total New to Brand Prescriptions (NBRx) for Telaprevir, Boceprevir, Simeprevir and Sofosbuvir 

  • By paying for new HCV therapies, payers can avoid the higher downstream costs of disease complications and the interim costs of less effective treatments, but their use has also shifted the point in time at which payers incur disease expenses
  • The challenge is rather than paying the costs of disease slowly over 15-20 years as the disease progresses, payers now face the immediate cost of paying for a large number of patients seeking a cure, thus increasing current-year disease costs and short-term budgets

 

Developed Market Spending Growth 2004-YTD June 2014

  • Developed markets’ medicine spending grew in aggregate at or below 5% every year since 2007, and reached its lowest point in 2012, when growth was near zero
  • Some countries are generating higher growth sooner, particularly the U.S., Germany and the U.K., which all have year-to-date (June 2014) growth in excess of 5%, while other developed markets continue with lower (but accelerating) growth rates

 

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Report Exhibits

The IMS Institute for Healthcare Informatics grants permission to use and reference this information, providing the IMS Institute report name and copyright information are clearly acknowledged. Exhibits may not be altered in any way.

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Note: All third party trademarks contained herein are the property of their respective owners and their use herein is for informational purposes and does not imply sponsorship or endorsement of their products or services.

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